Author: Neighbourhood Watch London

How to Stay Safe with Children Going Back to School

It’s that time of the year when the aroma of pumpkin spice fills crisp autumn air. It’s also the time that kids start to return to school! As elementary school, secondary school, and universities/colleges begin their terms, we at Neighbourhood Watch London will be focusing on Back to School Safety. For families with younger kids, going back to school means that it’s harder to find before and after school supervision. Some families might be getting to the point where their kids are now ready to supervise themselves or even their younger siblings. With milestones such as these, parents need...

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New Technology To Identify Your Personal Property

  The Trace Identified Pen is an anti-theft device helping residents to mark their property so that in the event of theft, they could have their property returned to them. Endorsed by the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police, the Trace Identified pens use a new technology called micro-etching, that can be used by property owners. This invisible adhesive inside the pen is filled with thousands of tiny pieces of metal, each bearing a single serial number that is registered to that pen. Each pen can mark up to 50 pieces of property. After purchase, the serial numbers of the pens are registered with the company in a database that police have access to. Whenever suspected stolen property is recovered, police can use special equipment to identify if the property was tagged and if so, what the pen’s serial number was. This can be then traced back to the owner. Several businesses in the area, who frequently deal with the sale and purchase of used goods, are now in support of the program and have been provided with signage and detection equipment to assist them in providing a valuable service and peace of mind to their customers. The public, pawn shops and second hand stores can all be active participants in theft prevention, theft detection and theft conviction using Trace. The package also includes warning stickers to use as a...

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Moving Into a Neighbourhood Watch Community

About 6 months ago, my family and I were considering buying our first home. Being new to London, we weren’t sure what to expect. What we did know was our priority was to find a safe, nurturing community for our children to grow up in. We worked with our realtor and did a lot of searching online before finding the best location for us. Once the deal was finalized, we started the process of moving in. Our first week in the new house was hectic, organizing furniture, cleaning, and learning about the area. One day while I was outside with the kids, one of our neighbours approached me with a big smile. He introduced himself and told me that he was the Area Coordinator for our Neighbourhood Watch community. I had heard of Neighbourhood Watch before, but didn’t know much about the program. He explained that he could be our point of contact in the event we notice anything suspicious in the area, if we’ll be going away for any extended time, or if we had any general questions about community events or goings on. He brought over a map of the neighbourhood and showed me all the houses that were part of our watch area. It was great to have that feeling of a tight-knit community, where safety and involvement are a priority. Our Area Coordinator then invited us...

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#EyesOpenLDN

Here at Neighbourhood Watch London, we’ve created a new hashtag to use on Twitter called #EyesOpenLDN. This hashtag is meant to be used as a reminder to be on the lookout for any suspicious activities, people that need assistance, and safety concerns in the community. With winter arriving in full swing, it’s important for every member of a Neighbourhood Watch community to be diligent in observing their surroundings. During the holidays, and shortly after, an increased number of people are away on vacation or visiting families, leaving homes empty and more susceptible to be targeted for criminal activity. Here are a few tips we recommend in the event someone is leaving their home for an extended period: Arrange a neighbour or family member to stop by the home to check the mailbox, collect newspapers, and pick up any packages. Ask a neighbour to shovel the driveway or walkway. This makes it safer for people like mail carriers to make deliveries, but also helps the home look lived in. Use motion activated lights in the driveway or near any entrances. Provide a spare key and list of contact numbers to a trusted person in the event of an emergency. Do something out of the ordinary when you lock your door before you leave, so it’s memorable and you’ll have peace of mind when you think back to remember if you in...

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